Archive for the ‘Self-promotion’ Category

There is something you find interesting, for a reason hard to explain. –Annie Dillard

Book shelf real estate is tiny. It pays to remember that our book will only occupy a small amount of territory on that prized book or library shelf (if it gets there at all!) so we need to stand out. A number of years ago, I read a magazine article about small business start-ups creating their own symbolism, just the same way big companies choose logos. I wondered, why shouldn’t Indie writers also utilise this tool and create their own logos?

*Reason One: Our brains remember images before facts.

It’s a well-known fact that symbols work on our subconscious, and we humans respond to visual clues. There’s a reason all the major brands always build their businesses around a symbol. Once they establish a logo, the emblem then becomes synonymous with their name.

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*Reason Two: A symbol is a reminder. Logos help readers remember you.

The same way our ancestors carved runes into rocks or hieroglyphs into stone, we can use symbols, as a bridge, an illustrative shorthand, in order to convey our message to the world. An image can say so much more than a word. ‘If you let go of your idea of what you are looking at in the symbol, it will reveal itself as information in the form of knowledge that cannot be read in books. It is a direct knowledge,’ said Gurudev Hamsah Nandatha, in his book, In the Presence of Truth. ‘It is because the symbol, it could be a painting or a spiritual symbol, has an impact on your mind. It’s a reminder.’

*Reason Three: Logos help readers to quickly “recognize you” on the book shelf. They give you visibility.

As an Indie writer, I’m seeking two things: to create good content and to build myself as a brand a reader can trust to deliver a good read. A symbol helps readers young and old remember the story and who delivered it.

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*How to Create Your Symbol

One: Find a relevant form.

When I went Indie to publish my first book, The Or’in of Tane Mahuta (http://amzn.com/B015K1KF0I), I wanted to start using my own logo. The Chronicles of Aden Weaver series is about shape shifters who morph from insect to human. I studied insects and looked at dragonfly wings. Then, I sketched and painted three possible options for a symbol to suit.

*Two: Enlist your readers in helping you choose.

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Others see things differently and can provide a valuable resource for feedback. I started a competition for the people on my mailing list. In the newsletter, I gave readers three options to choose from. I asked them to vote on the best. Each vote was counted as an entry, with the winner getting a free signed copy of the book.

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*Next Step: Stake your claim. Make the symbol your own, by stamping it on your books, your cards, your website, and your blog.

The winner by a majority was this one. I finally had a suitable symbol for my brand.

*Hot Tip: Make sure your logo goes on the spine of your book, where it will be seen.

You can see when I line my novel up with others, the way the publishing houses logos establish turf. At a glance, we know who they are. This is the same connectivity you want to happen in the reader’s brain with your brand when they see your masterpiece.

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I’m publishing my second book through CreateSpace. On the first proof for ‘The Sasori Empire,’ I discovered my logo was missing from the spine. Although I had originally submitted the symbol with the file, it’s possible I may have sent it to the wrong place. When you go through an online publishing service, you must read every instruction minutely, because if your work is not submitted to the company’s specific guidelines, it’s not “received” at all. Therefore, the error lies with you. And, every editing change you make will cost money.

I re-submitted the image via the correct channel and made sure my logo is featured in the correct spot on the cover. I’m saying to the world through my symbol, “I’m here.” This puts a smile on my face.

As an Indie, it’s vital to be happy with how your book is going to look sitting on the shelf, as well as how it reads inside. That way the whole package becomes authentic to you.

Are you smiling about the final look of your book? Ever thought of designing your own logo? 

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Talk to you later.

Keep Writing!

Yvette K. Carol

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There is something you find interesting, for a reason hard to explain. –Annie Dillard

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Subscribe to my Newsletter by emailing me with “Newsletter Subscription” in the subject line to: yvettecarol@hotmail.com

 

It’s time for another group posting of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Time to release our fears to the world – or offer encouragement to those who are feeling neurotic. If you’d like to join us, click on the tab above and sign up. We post the first Wednesday of every month. I encourage everyone to visit at least a dozen new blogs and leave a comment. Your words might be the encouragement someone needs.

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Every month, the organisers announce a question that members can answer in their IWSG Day post. Remember, the question is optional!!!

April IWSG Day Question: Have you taken advantage of the annual A to Z Challenge in terms of marketing, networking, publicity for your book? What were the results?

Answer: No.

Truth is, I suck at marketing. I remember scoffing a few years back over a writer’s comment on LinkedIn, when he said he wouldn’t be doing any of his own marketing, he was ‘the talent.’ But, since then, I’ve barely done any marketing myself, so who am I to talk? It’s a big failing so I am outing myself, right here.

The reality for all of us as writers in today’s world is that more people are writing and publishing books than ever before in history, and fewer people are reading them. This from John Sargent, CEO of Macmillan: “There are fewer and fewer newspapers out there, and their audiences are shrinking. Discovery is an ever-growing problem. Big titles get bigger, and everything else gets harder and harder to find and sells fewer and fewer copies.”

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Every writer, actor, model, artist, dancer, and musician in the current environment has to sell themselves through social media. We understand how it works and we do our bit to tweet things and share for our friends. Yet, I still have a visceral reaction when someone I’ve been talking to on sm for a while turns around and asks me to buy their book. Just this week, a friend I’ve been talking to and liking posts with, etc, for a year sent me a private message on Facebook asking me to buy her book, and help her book get off the ground by participating in a thunderclap campaign. There’s a part of me that wants to help her as a good person should, and there’s a part of me that’s pissed off with her now. It’s like; she’s betrayed my trust, so I won’t view her connection with me the same way again. I can’t quite get over that feeling of betrayal, and I don’t want to do it to other people.

It’s not that I haven’t tried to tackle marketing.

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Five years ago, I read books on how to market myself as a new author. I started the blog. Tick. I set up my own website. Tick. I joined a bunch of social media sites and started chatting. Tick. I started compiling an email list and writing a regular newsletter. Tick. I made friends with everyone I met and traded details. Tick.

Yet, when my first book, ‘The Or’in of Tane Mahuta’ came out in 2015, not only did I not ask my friends to buy my book, I actually bought sixty copies and gave the books away. I posted packages to the really special friends I’d made on the net, all around the world. I thought I’m not going to make a penny out of this. And, I didn’t.

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*This is not something I would advocate for those writers starting out, who are hoping to make a living out of their work, by the way.

This trait means I can’t quite seem to get over the hump between me as the writer and the speed bump of selling my book to my friends. Lucky for me, profit is not as high on my list of priorities. I go by the adage, when you realize you have enough there’s always plenty. I run a tight ship and I have enough so I don’t need more. I like to measure my success by my personal growth and the good friendships I have made along the way. The online writers community is amazing. My friends are so sustaining and caring. Right now, that’s more important.

I love this life of being a writer, and creating books. I’m editing my second book, ‘The Sasori Empire,’ and the message that comes through towards the end is how important his friendships are becoming to the hero, Aden. Interesting how life and one’s fiction often parallels, isn’t it?

How about you, what marketing do you do?

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Talk to you later.

Keep on Creating!

Yvette K. Carol

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“If you don’t make mistakes you won’t make anything.” ~ Anon

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Subscribe to my Newsletter by emailing me with “Newsletter Subscription” in the subject line to: yvettecarol@hotmail.com

When creating your own brand, my advice is to keep your brand consistent. For instance, my brand is Kristen Lamb. ~ We Are Not Alone.

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At some point, each new writer must make a decision about which name is going to appear on the front cover of their books and stories.

These days, once you commit to a name, this becomes synonymous with your brand. Every little digital step we take these days gets linked to and adds incrementally to our brand. This is why we need to choose wisely where our writer’s names are concerned.

We don’t want to have to do the spadework all over again to build a new brand if we have to change name somewhere along the way.

For many years, I couldn’t decide which moniker I was going to use as a writer. Luckily, I was on Facebook, and I stumbled across Kristen Lamb. She had written a book in 2010 on social media for writers, We Are Not Alone, ‘The Writer’s Guide to Social Media.’ This book is no longer available in the original format, as it needed updating. I believe the updated version Rise of the Machines—Human Authors in a Digital World  is available now.

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It was 2011. I was new to the net. I was simply a full time mother who wrote part time. I was everyone’s poor cousin. Unpublished, at the time, I had neither a blog, nor a newsletter, website, or any of the must-haves for the modern writer. I was just starting out into the jungle of the strange and mysterious world of social media, and the whole thing seemed rather intimidating and scary.

After purchasing a copy of We Are Not Alone, Lamb’s short yet impactful book, I read it in one gulp. I must admit, I went rather “Shelton” and adhered to Lamb’s principles to the letter.

With regards the subject of author names, pen names, and author brand, Lamb advocated thinking in a broad fashion across one’s social media platforms, and seeing for oneself the value in having one name, one brand, across all platforms. ‘Just because Twitter allows you to have multiple identities doesn’t mean it is a good idea, especially if you are unpublished.’

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This felt like a wise decision and the simplest, to choose a writer’s name that I would use across every social media platform.

I considered the idea of letting go of my surname and using Yvette Carol, my first and middle names. I remembered a conversation I had had about this subject with my grandmother about a decade before. At the time, I had asked Nan for her opinion on which pseudonym I should choose.

Nan said, “While I would love to see the family name on the spine of a book, up on the shelf, I think ‘Yvette Carol’ sounds more like an author.”

I felt the same way. It fitted the criteria in Lamb’s book, and most importantly, it felt like me.

I changed my name by deed poll and committed to it across all genres and all areas of my life. It really felt like taking control. Being bold. And making a statement on the internet, as in, ‘This is my name. This is my claim.’

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When it comes to choosing your writer’s name, what criteria can you use?

Make sure the words are punchy and memorable. Usually, you want to test how it sounds by saying it aloud a few times to find out how it flows.

As Lamb said, ‘In order to maximise sales, your goal is to become a brand. Brand=Big Sales.’ You want to think catchy. However, shorter isn’t necessarily better. Just ask Arnold Schwarzenegger! He stayed true to his name.’

Kristen Lamb put it perfectly, when she said, ‘The internet has valuable real estate that you will want to command. How you claim that digital real estate is by using your name.’

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Lamb’s second key bit of advice re choosing the name to go by for an author was to consider what product or genre or style they wanted their name to be associated with. Then, you market yourself that way from then on. Hence, the reason my blog and website are titled, Yvette Carol, Children’s Writer.

Thank you, Kristen for the great advice!

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In a nutshell, your writer’s name is designed to be pithy and memorable

It’s designed to reflect you and your brand.

It’s designed to be flexible, so you can ‘be consistent across all platforms’

It’s designed to be classic, to last forever.

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How did you find your writer’s name or do you use your given birth name?

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Talk to you later.

Keep on Creating!

Yvette K. Carol

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Now here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that. ~ Lewis Carroll

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Subscribe to my Newsletter by emailing me with “Newsletter Subscription” in the subject line to: yvettecarol@hotmail.com

 

It’s time for another group posting of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Time to release our fears to the world – or offer encouragement to those who are feeling neurotic. If you’d like to join us, click on the tab above and sign up. We post the first Wednesday of every month. I encourage everyone to visit at least a dozen new blogs and leave a comment. Your words might be the encouragement someone needs.

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When the upper-ups at IWSG headquarters decided to bring in the Question of the Month, earlier this year, I admit to not exactly clapping my hands with glee. I opted out at first.

You see, I like to write every post from the point of view of sharing either what’s been going on for me, or what I’ve been thinking, or doing creatively, or experiencing through my kids and my family. As ‘the Question’ was only a suggestion, not a given, I decided to make my own choice as to this blog’s content.

I wanted to remain true to my ideals. Yet, as the year went on, I noticed other #IWSG bloggers I visited always answered the Question. I began to feel like the only kid on the playground, while all the other kids are jostling for elbow-room in the sandpit.

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Long story, short, last month I answered the Question. It was fun. I imagined myself one of the big gun authors being asked a question about my writing career by a newspaper reporter.

December 7, the IWSG Question of the month – In terms of your writing career, where do you see yourself five years from now, and what’s your plan to get there?

Great question!

I see myself with the series, The Chronicles of Aden Weaver, finished and published. I see spin-offs from the series, evolving naturally. I can see the books being made into some sort of local production, either theatre or movie, or maybe artwork springing from it, or the series being made into some sort of video game.

I see myself blissful at work on the next book/s.

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Have you heard of making a “vision board?” I saw the idea on an Oprah show back in the day. You create a pictorial poster of what you hope to achieve. I preferred writing down my dreams. I call mine a “wish list.” Each year, on my birthday (which was the day before yesterday) I update my wish list for future dreams and goals. For more than ten years now, at the bottom of each list, I’ve written the same line. “Peter Jackson turns my books into movies.” That’s a big dream, however if we’re talking about what I really want to achieve in five years, then!

My plan to get there is to keep on writing. Write. Write and learn. Learn and write.

I shall also keep on networking, which is a necessity these days, to be active on social media and create an active digital footprint. I’ll carry on blogging, tweeting, putting content on my YouTube channel, and pinning on Pinterest. I’ll keep on building my email list for my *Newsletter and putting out quality content.

(*For Newsletter, e me at yvettecarol@hotmail.com put “Subscribe” in subject line, you will automatically be added to the family!)

I think it’s important now that I have overcome my fear of public speaking to keep up the public speaking to improve my self-confidence levels.

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Then, we come to the most important thing I intend to keep on doing. Those who have known me on the ether for a while will have heard this story before, however, I always find its worth repeating. Back when I was into multi-level marketing, our very wealthy, mega-successful, charismatic leader took me aside one time, to pass on a gem of her wisdom. I remember we were standing in the car-park, after an evening meeting.

She said, she was going to pass on the single most important thing I had to do.

‘I don’t mean just in business, I mean in life. Forget about the money, building a business is not about that. You must think one way and one way only. There is only one thing you need to do. And that is, Spread the Love. Everything you do, everything you say, every action every day, you Spread the Love. That’s all you need to do.’

I really took the message to heart. I went away from that night and I have applied that principle to everything I’ve done since. It works for me.

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Talk to you later.

Keep on Creating!

Yvette K. Carol

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‘New Zealanders by nature of our isolation just go ahead and do things our own way. That’s the New Zealand spirit.’ ~ Peter Jackson

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Subscribe to my Newsletter by emailing me with “Newsletter Subscription” in the subject line to: yvettecarol@hotmail.com

 

It’s Wednesday and time for another group posting of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Time to release our fears to the world – or offer encouragement to those who are feeling neurotic. If you’d like to join us, click on the tab above and sign up. We post the first Wednesday of every month. I encourage everyone to visit at least a dozen new blogs and leave a comment. Your words might be the encouragement someone needs.

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What am I feeling insecure about? Speaking in public. Yes, that’s right. I’m a Toastmaster who’s terrified of giving speeches.

A week ago, I was asked to speak to a group of people about my books. My first reaction? To think, ‘I can’t do that!’ Yesterday, I was asked to give a speech at a public venue this coming weekend, and my reaction was to feel, I can’t!

I know it’s just fear. And, I also know it comes from being an introverted writer. Talk about a double whammy! I know there must be other introverted writers out there, and most definitely there are many of the poor, frustrated people who live with them, who want to wrap their head around it a bit more. Here’s my take.

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To be a writer these days, you need to be able to speak in public. For that reason, I started going to Toastmasters nearly a year ago, and yet, I’m still terrified every time I take the stage.

The thing for the introvert is this. We can do everything within our power to overcome this fear of public speaking, yet, the natural inclination is to solitude. We still gain our energy from retreat.

Coming forward takes all my courage. It makes the stage fright seem doubly worse. There’s giving the talk itself and, then, there’s also the overwhelming prospect of a room full of strangers. It feels a little bit like swimming uphill.

‘Introverts are more concerned with the inner world of the mind. They often avoid social situations because being around people drains their energy. This is true even if they have good social skills. After being with people for any length of time, such as at a party, they need time alone to “recharge.” ~ By Carol Bainbridge, Gifted Children Expert

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At Toastmasters last week, my “adopted grandfather” Bruce brought along a friend, Bob, who also lives at the same retirement village.

Bob expressed interest in my book. He was one of those sweet old gentlemen you warm to right away: twinkly-eyed, white-haired, white-bearded, who are extremely enthusiastic about literature and authors in general. He said, “It always makes such a difference if you can say you’ve met the author.”

‘What sort of books do you write?’ he asked.

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I tried to explain the genre, (fantasy fiction) and that it was aimed at the 9-12-year-old reading level. But, even as the words of description were leaving my mouth, I regretted them, and wished I’d said something else.

Lesson learned: an introverted writer should have a blurb rehearsed beforehand, a standard phrase that can be repeated in the time it takes to ride an elevator, in other words, have an “elevator pitch” ready. In a public situation, we don’t adlib very well.

In a starry-eyed fashion, Bob suggested I could get Bruce to organize a luncheon at their village, for me to come and talk about my book!

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Despite shrinking inside, I said, “Yes, that’s a good idea.”

“Oh, you’d draw quite a crowd, we love hearing about that sort of thing down at the village,” Bob said, beaming all the while.

Crowds – my least favourite thing. I used to think that I had a phobia of crowds but it’s not that I am rattled by being among a large group of people; it’s that being there depletes my energy. This is how it is being an introvert.

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‘When introverts want to be alone, it is not a sign of depression. It means that they either need to regain their energy from being around people or they simply want the time to be with their own thoughts. Being with people, even people they like and are comfortable with can prevent them from their desire to be quietly introspective.’

I am fighting the good fight. I’m doing the work. I’m attending the weekly Toastmasters meetings and I’m somehow inexplicably surviving each speech I give. Yet, the thought of speaking in public this weekend is giving me palpitations!

Are you an introvert writer? How do you handle the stage fright? I need tips!

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Talk to you later.

Keep on Creating!

Yvette K. Carol

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“The world today does not understand, in either man or woman, the need to be alone. What a commentary on our civilization, when being alone is considered suspect; when one has to apologize for it, make excuses, hide the fact that one practices it–like a secret vice!The artist knows he must be alone to create: the writer, to work out his thoughts; the musician, to compose; the saint, to pray.’ Anne Morrow Lindberg

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Hey, guys,

Will you do me a favour, and share this widely? It’s a great opportunity to support a worthy cause. Erik Weibel, young author and book-reviewer, and general, all-round rising star, deserves for this post to be spread as widely as possible. His rural school seeks donations for new band uniforms.

I mean, c’mon!

This is for you and your school band, Erik. I hope you get your new uniforms. I look forward to the photos and the blog post, when you do!

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All the best, Yvette x

 

Don’t forget what happened to the man who suddenly got everything he wanted. He lived happily ever after. Roald Dahl

 

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Subscribe to my Newsletter by emailing me with “Newsletter Subscription” in the subject line to: yvettecarol@hotmail.com

 

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This Kid Reviews Books

HELLO blog readers!

I very rarely post about anything other than books, writing, literacy, and libraries.

I also have only ever once posted about raising money for a cause.

I have something I care a lot about that I wanted to put out in the blogosphere. I go to a small rural school in Pennsylvania. We don’t have a lot of money for things like Smartboards, iPads, or masking tape (seriously – our librarian ran out of masking tape one year…) BUT OUR TEACHERS ROCK! They are the best of the best and with them we don’t need a bunch of technology (well maybe we do need the tape, but we did eventually get that).

One of the programs at my school that I really enjoy is our band program. I find music challenging. It makes a different part of my brain fire up when I listen to or try…

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‘These days writers don’t get to let their written words speak for themselves. Books must be promoted, which means that book writing is all about book speaking.’ ~ Laura Vanderkam

I’ll admit I tried to resist this truth for many years! In the early days, I wanted to hide in my cubby and write the books. Someone else would sell them. Yet, hearing salient quotes like this reminded me of the reasons to overcome this personal obstacle.

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I have always hated public speaking. Let me amend that. I’ve hated it since the age of 12, when I first felt humiliated on stage. I had tried to sing the lead in the HMS Pinafore at my school production, while suffering a throat infection. On a prolonged high note, my voice broke. In one instant, I saw my parents’ stricken faces, and the shame set in.

At the age of 15, I joined a school production. It was being put on by the cool group, whom I wanted to befriend. Midway through our big final number, one of the girls grabbed me and swung me by my ankles around in circles. My skirt flew over my head.

My terror of public speaking had been firmly cemented into place. I’d never set foot on a stage again. Or, so I thought.

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There were two times after that, when at big family occasions, I was called upon to speak. I messed up the speeches so royally, they’ve become stuff of family legend. Pulled out and retold at family parties, just to remind me that family never forgets.

Upon engaging a “life coach” a few years ago, I was encouraged to face my fear of public speaking, by doing it.

I said, ‘That isn’t going to happen, because I have a truly paralyzing fear.’

The coach said, ‘That’s just a story, okay? We all tell ourselves stories. Chris de Petty says, If you’re going to make shit up, make good shit up.

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I’ll admit I thought the “cure” was a bit harsh. Yet, apparently, this is a common approach for this type of self-conscious block and it does have good results.

In the January 2016 issue of Toastmaster, there was an interview with a former stutterer, Ken Bevers. Ken joined the McGuire Program which is for people with speech impediments. The program supported him to front up to his fear – by going to busy public places like shopping centers and introducing himself to strangers. In the years since then, Bevers has moved on to become the President of his club, and has been promoted at work to a senior position in his firm.

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*Hot Tip: If you want a breakthrough in being able to speak in front of audiences, take a stand-up comedy class. Improv would help, too. Or join Toastmasters.

Despite my immense misgivings, a year ago, friend and author, Lynn Kelley, and I challenged one another to join Toastmasters.

We discovered the life-affirming act of facing down the fear of doing each speech carries with it a payoff. There’s the satisfaction of winning that small victory. This acts like confidence fertilizer.

Of course, extra confidence is helpful in any professional arena. When interviewed in the February 2016 issue of Toastmaster, singer and producer, Quinn Lemley, said, ‘During interviews I stuttered or spoke too fast. I thought Toastmasters would help – and it has!’

The reason Lynn and I joined was to build our book speaking skills.

‘This will prepare me to do lectures and speaking engagements and school visits.’ Lynn Kelley said, in a conversation we had on Facebook recently. ‘You might be asked to speak at a conference someday and Toastmasters will prepare you for that.’

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Author and speaker, Laura Vanderkam, explains why the skill of public speaking is good for writers. If I want to keep writing books, I need my books to sell, and that means getting up in front of all kinds of audiences to talk about my ideas.

Toastmasters, Improv, or learning a skill like stand-up comedy can prepare us for promotional opportunities as writers. Fun ways to brush up weekly on our book speaking skills.

What about you? Are there any skills you intend to master in 2016? How do you approach your Book Speaking?

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Talk to you later,

Yvette K. Carol

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In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years. ~ Abraham Lincoln

 

Marketing is a hot topic for writers because everyone wants to know the magic bullet. How do we tweak our approach to nab the most readers?

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One of my favourite writers and bloggers, Chuck Wendig had these sage words to say on the topic of marketing for writers, ‘Self-promotion is a seduction, not a kick in the crotch. It’s a conversation in a smoky bar, not a soapbox-and-a-bullhorn. You wrote a book? Congratulations, but nobody gives a hot cup of shit. Everybody writes books now.’

Working authors know that marketing is one of the gnarliest parts of the business. I read at least a couple of articles on marketing a day. I think for those of us who wish to learn about non-offensive self-promotion for our art, we seek information from trustworthy sources. I’m always seeking the right advisors as I try to develop a marketing model that fits me.

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When I first ventured onto social media, about five years ago, I remember a conversation I had with some other writers over on LinkedIn. In a public forum, a fellow writer commented that he wouldn’t be getting involved with ‘the sales’ of his books. He was ‘the talent,’ and the marketing ‘was the publisher’s job.’

In the past, I believe the authors could leave ‘the sales’ up to the publishing house. Nowadays, a small tier of top authors may exist in the rarefied realm of being “the talent,” however, the number of first-time authors who receive this sort of royal treatment would likely be nil. These days, if you’re an Indie author and self-publish, you will do 100% of the marketing. If you’re published by someone else, be they big or small, you’ll do 95% of the marketing. Either way, the buck stops with you.

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Teacher and digital media advisor, Jane Friedman advises, ‘Before pub day, every author must consider his or her marketing model. What approach builds on the assets you already have, or complements your strengths and is feasible for the readers you currently reach?’

Rather than chasing the magical formula for instant success, Jane gives guidance on how to take the long term approach, here’s a link to the post, ‘Long Term Marketing Models for Self Published Authors,’ by Jane guest posting over on Publishers Weekly: https://janefriedman.com/long-term-marketing-models-for-self-published-authors/  (Thanks to friend and critique partner, Robyn Campbell, who sent it through).

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Marketing for today’s author gets harder by the day, as competition for the reader’s dollar increases. And the “marketplace” is constantly evolving, too, which makes it even more of a challenge to keep up, especially for oldies, like me. There’s no more hiding out in caves or towers for creative types these days. We have to keep our finger on the pulse. ‘It took web-based Goodreads seven years to reach 25 million people. It took mobile-based “whatsapp” three years to hit 200 million users and another two years to reach 500 million,’ said Elizabeth Dimarco

Author, Curtis Sittenfeld, said, ‘By not being active on social media, you’re probably shooting yourself in the foot. That said, faking fluency with or interest in forms of social media that don’t do it for you is much harder than making up dialogue for imaginary characters.’

You can’t fake “fluency” which is why I’ve written numerous posts in the past about following your heart where social media is concerned. You have to do what feels right for you in order to create an authentic Marketing Model that will work for you.

What is your Marketing Model?

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Teacher and author, Bob Mayer relates, ‘I market using . . .Slideshare, blogs, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, etc, all from home. I used to not be a fan of book trailers, and while I don’t think they do much direct selling, they increase your digital footprint. And they’re cool.’

Personally, my preferred forms of contact with the world would be via Facebook, my blog, Newsletter, Twitter and Pinterest.

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Social media expert, Kristen Lamb, says in her new book, Rise of the Machines—Human Authors in a Digital World , ‘Give a writer a marketing gimmick and he’ll sell a few books today. Give a writer the keys to connect to her digital community, and she’ll sell books for life.’

That’s so true. It’s all about making friends as you go; otherwise it’s going to be a tough, lonely journey. I like Kristen’s advice re building community. Whichever way you choose, my belief is you need to stick to doing the things you most enjoy so that you can maintain them long-term.

Here’s my leg-up. I want to share my own humble marketing plan.

I’m sure there are others out there far more extensive. However, I have young boys at home. I haven’t got time to muck around. So if you’re up for a simple Marketing Model, this is the list I made prior to publishing my debut novel, ‘The Or’in of Tane Mahuta’ last year.

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*Ask for reviews on the inside rear cover of my book

*Book Launch

*Announce launch on Facebook/Twitter/LinkedIn/Google+/Pinterest/Goodreads

*Blog tour

*Line up guest posts on other blogs (think, “Adjacent fans”)

*Media page on website

*Make announcement with buy links to mailing list, via newsletter

*Author Page on Goodreads, add my book

*Author Page on Facebook

*Author Page on Amazon

*Launch Page on Slideshare

*Request reviews from reviewers

*Post reviews on website

*Pay for a promotion on BookBub, Beezeebooks, and ShelfLife

*Enrol in KDP Select

The list of possibilities can be endless.

Have you started wrestling with the beast of self-promotion? Any tips to share? Had any horror stories en route to finding your best Marketing Model?

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Talk to you later.

Keep on Creating!

Yvette K. Carol

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‘Focus on craft; not marketing and promotion. You can’t promote crap. The best marketing is a good story; better marketing is more good stories.’ ~ Bob Mayer

‘Treat writing like a hobby and you will receive nothing but the fruits of a hobby. It’s a vocation. Honor it as such.’ ~ Owen Egerton

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