It’s time for another group posting of the Insecure Writer’s Support Group! Time to release our fears to the world – or offer encouragement to those who are feeling neurotic. If you’d like to join us, click on the tab above and sign up. We post the first Wednesday of every month. I encourage everyone to visit at least a dozen new blogs and leave a comment. Your words might be the encouragement someone needs.

Every month, the organisers announce a question that members can answer in their IWSG Day post. Remember, the question is optional!!!

InsecureWritersSupportGroup

OPTIONAL IWSG Day Question: What publishing path are you considering/did you take, and why?

I’m going to answer both parts of that question. When I put out The Last Tree, the third book of the Chronicles of Aden Weaver, in 2019, I aim to self publish. But, that’s not to say going Indie is an easy option. I self published The Or’in of Tane Mahuta in 2015 and The Sasori Empire in 2017, and both journeys were equally back breaking.

Going Indie is a bit like having babies: the agony and hardship and gruelling aspect of self publishing your stories is epic. As you sweat your way through the nightmare of endless editing hell and the 101 jobs that need doing, you swear with a fist raised to the sky that once you’ve got this book out, that’s it, you’re done with going Indie.

Screen Shot 2015-09-11 at 4.13.01 pm

In more sober moments, you tell friends that the next time you publish a book you’ll get someone else to do the donkey work. You’re totally willing to go out on the streets to knock on the doors and basically stalk the gatekeepers again, submitting your manuscripts to editor after editor. You’re convinced you’d rather trudge the rounds of submission forever, than tackle self publishing again.

Then, your beautiful baby is born. You have the party, you hold your novel in your hands, sniff it, and you look at it adoringly. Sometime later, after the glow has worn off and a bit more time has gone past, you realize you want to do it all over again.

You dive back into being an Indie with your next work because:

 

  1. Despite the backbreaking hours of hard work, it’s really rewarding.
  2. Every single decision is in your hands which is overwhelming, yet you have control over the look of the whole package, which is exhilarating (hee hee, ha ha!)
  3. 63570450_High Resolution Front Cover_7092916
  4. Every single cent ever made goes to you.
  5. I once turned down a publishing offer because they wanted to change the name of the characters! As an Indie, you get to be the boss, and say how the story goes and no one else.
  6. Because you have to do the book launches and marketing yourself, it drives you to learn new skills and expand your repertoire.
  7. You have more to offer in terms of advice and knowhow when young authors come asking. I’ve been surprised in the last ten years how many up and coming writers have asked me questions. It’s helpful in those situations to have a clue.
  8. Draft_3c
  9. For me, one of the big reasons for self publishing is no one wanted to publish my stories the way I wanted to read them. So, in order for me to put out my anthropomorphic fantasy adventure fiction for the upper middle grade market (9-13-year-olds), I had to do it myself. Sometimes, when the slice of the market you’re aiming at is so small, it just isn’t economically viable for a traditional publishing house to invest in a niche with such low returns. So, in order to stay true to the material, I had to produce it myself.

For me, this is vitally important, because my entire life is a quest for truth, for honesty, the essence of things. I aim to cleave to the material the muse gives me.

For me, the gut feeling is this: that my only job as the author is to produce the copy, buff and polish it with editing, and do my utmost not to wreck the original inspiration.

If the gatekeepers can’t get behind my vision or this particular creation, then so be it. I get to say, no matter, I’m publishing it anyway. And, I love that!

8. Ultimately, it feels good because it feels like investing in myself.

What about you, what publishing path will you take?

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Keep Writing!

Yvette K. Carol

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Nothing great was ever achieved without enthusiasm. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

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Subscribe to my Newsletter by emailing me with “Newsletter Subscription” in the subject line to: yvettecarol@hotmail.com

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Comments
  1. emaginette says:

    I prefer the traditional method, but I started with small presses. They are more forgiving and are still respected in the industry if you choose carefully. 😉

    Liked by 1 person

  2. cleemckenzie says:

    I love your comparison of self-publishing to childbirth. It’s perfect. And I do understand the reasons going Indie is so exciting and rewarding. I’ve published both ways, so I’ve had a chance to experience a bit of it all.

    Thank you so much for your visit to my place. I appreciated your comment so much.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. ChrysFey says:

    A publisher wanted to change the name of the characters? Oh my gosh! Who does that? That’s crazy to ask a writer to change their character names. I understand suggesting a new title, but not character names. *shakes heads*

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Olga Godim says:

    I started with a small press, but I wasn’t happy with them. The lack of control drove me crazy, and there was no help from them on the marketing front. Next time, I’m going to self-publish. At least, I won’t have anyone to blame but myself.

    Liked by 1 person

    • yvettecarol says:

      Yes. I have a friend who’s a popular children’s writer here in New Zealand, whose last thirty-three books were published by traditional publishers. She said, that with trad. publishing, everyone takes their little portion of the pie as the book goes down the line, and there’s very little money left for you as the author at the end. But, she said, on the last book she put out, she decided to self-publish and she did. “I’ll never look back,” was the resounding response. Her main point being again the money, in fact, it was she who said, “Every single cent ever made goes to you.” Good luck, Olga, going Indie, and be sure to let us know how you go! 🙂

      Like

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